Included Through Kenosis

I hope you’ve enjoyed exploring a little bit about kenosis as much as I have. As the point of this blog is learning more about God, I’ve given this fascinating and foundational aspect of who he is extra space. Going deeper into and contemplating the self-emptying of God is an amazing look into how love functions and how it motivated everything he has done for us.

“The self-humiliation of God is fulfilled in the incarnation of the Son. God permits an existence different from his own by limiting himself. He withdraws his omnipotence in order to set his image  ̶  men and women  ̶  free. The divine kenosis which begins with the creation of the world reaches its perfected and completed form in the incarnation of the Son. And the kenosis is realized on the cross. God becomes the God who identifies himself with men and women to the point of death, and beyond” (Jurgen Moltmann).

Barry Robinson (see below) adds this to Moltmann’s thoughts: “It’s the phrase ‘and beyond’ that’s intriguing. Could this imply that the fullness and consummation of God’s self-emptying is witnessed in the ascended and exalted Christ retaining his humanity as the God-man and not shedding it at the resurrection? (Paul speaks of the man Christ Jesus after his resurrection in 1 Timothy 2:5.) As Graham Kendrick’s hymn Meekness and Majesty says, Jesus

Barry Robinson (see below) adds this to Moltmann’s thoughts: “It’s the phrase ‘and beyond’ that’s intriguing. Could this imply that the fullness and consummation of God’s self-emptying is witnessed in the ascended and exalted Christ retaining his humanity as the God-man and not shedding it at the resurrection? (Paul speaks of the man Christ Jesus after his resurrection in 1 Timothy 2:5.) As Graham Kendrick’s hymn Meekness and Majesty says, Jesus ‘lifts our humanity to the heights of his throne.’ To mysteriously include humanity within the eternal being of the Word seems to me to be the greatest act of self-emptying  ̶  not so much by the subtraction of who the Word is, but by the addition of who we are.”

If you’d like to read more about kenosis, this article and this chart might be interesting to you. They are provided courtesy of Barry Robinson. His bio is included at the end of the article, as well as a suggested reading list. His article, published as a six-part devotional on Day-by-Day out of the UK, is what first sparked my interest in this topic.

Author: ttkach

Writer, cyclist, paper-crafter, mom, gardener.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s